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2022 Ford F-150 Lightning goes into pre-production

Ludachris

Moderator
Staff member
34
13
The all electric Ford F-150 Lighting - at a starting price of $39,974, a range of 300 miles, output of 563hp, 10k lbs towing capacity, and 2k lbs payload rating, is this really a truck that will truly open the flood gates to mass electric vehicle adoption? Seems like if Ford gets this right it has the potential to be one of the most important vehicles (not just trucks) in several decades. We all know that trucks rule in the US.

How many of you would actually be interested in this? I'm still an old school internal combustion engine guy, but I'm very interested to see how this plays out.

 
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Fellro

Moderator
Staff member
Range is everything for me. I run about 30 miles one way to work, and road trips of 500 miles one way with a trailer aren't uncommon. I almost jumped on a hybrid Escape until the miles and age of the battery scared me away. It had rust issues, but I figured probably could fix it since it was just a rear shock mount. I'm hoping either a power generation or battery breakthrough shows up soon so that it would be more worth it. Although disasters such as hurricanes or inland hurricanes (derecho) show that unless you can generate your own power, the grid isn't ready for full on electric.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
Until they are reliable in minus 40, I will consider it then.
The one fly in the ointment with any of these electric vehicles is the power grid and existing infrastructure. Given that on a hot day household a/c units can cause consumption to spike and our overlords ask us to cut back on usage...I wonder how this will bode when 2 vehicles are plugged in pulling 20kw from a house.
 

DNFXDLI

The Token Canadian
Staff member
I'm guessing 2 vehicles in a driveway would tax a typical juicebox to the limit?
Depends on the level of charge. They can be charged at a house from 1800 watts all the way up to 11kw. The issues that are arise are multiple.
First is the size of the house service and associated loads within that house....a typical non electric heated house has a 100 amp service....take a 10kw load of charging a car....42 amps at 240v....and it is a continuous load....so you can see where that is going to lead.

With an electrically heated house you likely will have 20kw+ of connected heating load...even though they will normally be a 200amp services you just used up 84 amps of that.

Then there is the case of the utility supply....they will normally use transformers that are quite undersized and they do fine as most household loads are non continuous....as in they cycle on/off....start connecting a bunch of 10kw loads for several hours at a time and shit will start exploding and catching fire....then a step further upstream the primary HV cabling will become unhappy.

All in all it's pretty damn entertaining...for more shits and giggles see what dear 'ol Mr. Musk's awesome batteries are doing in Australia....hint...not well lol.
 

fatherdoug

Tonto Papadapolous
I just learned a lot! Thank you. The other part of the story is that power generation tends to shed load at night for various reasons, such as demand for load. The other reason is to work on equipment at night when generation is down. That window of opportunity could disappear if charging cars happens at night.
 
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